Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

Race & institutional factors play an important role in pharmacogenomic trial participation

2015-07-28
TAMPA, Fla. - Cancer therapy has evolved from a "one-size-fits-all" type of treatment plan to a personalized approach based on a patient's type of cancer, the protein and genetic markers found in their tumors and their response to therapy. Important aspects of the personalized approach are pharmacogenomic studies that analyze associations between genetic variations and patient drug responses. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have published a study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that analyzed the participation rate of patients in pharmacogenomic trials. ...

Study finds unexpected biases against teen girls' leadership

2015-07-28
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-- Making Caring Common (MCC), a project of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, today released new research that suggests that many teen boys and teen girls--and some of their parents--have biases against teen girls as leaders. These biases could be powerful barriers to leadership for a generation of teen girls with historically high levels of education who are key to closing our nation's gender gap in leadership. The report also suggests that much can be done to prevent and reduce gender biases in children. Titled "Leaning Out: Teen Girls and Gender ...

Ewing's sarcoma: A dangerous liaison

2015-07-28
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous somatic mutation to promote the development of Ewing's sarcoma. Ewing's sarcoma is an aggressive bone cancer that occurs primarily in children, adolescents and young adults. The tumor cells are characterized by a single spontaneous 'driver mutation', which results in formation of the oncogenic fusion gene EWSR1-FLI1. Its protein product EWSR1-FLI1, ...

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

2015-07-28
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according to the new research. Humans add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere through fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. About 40 percent of this carbon stays in the atmosphere and roughly 30 percent enters the ocean, according to the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Scientists thought the remaining carbon was taken ...

Movement tracking technology sheds light on different speech disorders in children

2015-07-28
Facial motion capture - the same technology used to develop realistic computer graphics in video games and movies - has been used to identify differences between children with childhood apraxia of speech and those with other types of speech disorders, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. "In our study, we see evidence of a movement deficit in children with apraxia of speech, but more importantly, aspects of their speech movements look different from children with other speech disorders," said study author Maria Grigos, ...

Link between mood, pain in rheumatoid arthritis patients

2015-07-28
Depressive symptoms and mood in the moment may predict momentary pain among rheumatoid arthritis patients, according to Penn State researchers. "The results of this study link momentary positive and negative mood with momentary pain in daily life," said Jennifer E. Graham-Engeland, associate professor of biobehavioral health. "That is, we found evidence consistent with a common, but largely untested, contention that mood in the moment is associated with fluctuation in pain and pain-related restrictions." The link was examined among individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, ...

Understanding the molecular origin of epigenetic markers

2015-07-28
Researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Cambridge University and New York University, led by Modesto Orozco, Group Leader at IRB Barcelona, Director of Life Sciences at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) and Professor at the University of Barcelona (UB), have determined the mechanics behind of one of the most common epigenetic modifications: histone-tail acetylation. Acetylation is a means by which a cell can control the expression of its genes. The study published in the prestigious Journal of the American Chemical Society ...

Metagenome-wide association study on oral microbiome uncovered markers for RA

2015-07-28
July 28, 2015, Shenzhen, China -Researchers from BGI, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, etc., reported the study on the oral and the gut microbiome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The results show that the gut and oral microbiome are involved in the pathophysiology and management of RA and provide indication for developing microbiome-assisted personalized treatments. The latest finding was published online today in Nature Medicine. RA is a debilitating autoimmune disorder affecting tens of millions of people worldwide, while the mortality in the patients increases ...

Cystic fibrosis microorganisms survive on little to no oxygen

2015-07-28
WASHINGTON, DC - July 28, 2015 - Microbes contributing to cystic fibrosis (CF) are able to survive in saliva and mucus that is chemically heterogeneous, including significant portions that are largely devoid of oxygen, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study, which evaluated sputum samples from 22 pediatric CF patients, found that the microbiologic environment can differ between patients, and even within the same patient at different points in time. Researchers also noted ...

High-fat maternal diet changes newborn heart 'tastebuds'

2015-07-28
Baby rats whose mothers were fed a high-fat diet had larger than normal hearts with fewer taste receptors for bitter flavours, according to new UNSW research. The study, led by the UNSW Head of Pharmacology Professor Margaret Morris and published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, examined the effect of a fatty maternal diet on receptors in the hearts of newborn rats, including those which detect certain flavours. Taste receptors have only recently been shown to exist outside the mouth, at sites including the heart, where both bitter and umami - or ...

Major European mouse study reveals the role of genes in disease

2015-07-28
Since mice share 90 percent of our genes they play an important role in understanding human genetics. The European Mouse Disease Clinic (EUMODIC) brought together scientists from across Europe to investigate the functions of 320 genes in mice. Over half of these genes had no previously known role, and the remaining genes were poorly understood. In order to study gene function, the EUMODIC consortium produced mouse lines which each had a single gene removed. These mouse lines were then analyzed in mouse clinics, where each line was assessed by a series of tests and investigations, ...

Fatty acid increases performance of cellular powerhouse

2015-07-28
Mitochondria are essential to all higher forms of life. Every animal and plant depends on these small intracellular structures. Mitochondria have multiple tasks: Since they generate most of the cell's biochemical energy, they are referred to as the powerhouses of the cell. In addition, they are responsible for producing and breaking down amino acids and fats. They also regulate cellular death, called apoptosis. As a result, the spectrum of diseases that are linked to mitochondrial defects is wide, ranging from severe muscular and nervous disorders to neurodegenerative ...

Identifying ever-growing disturbances leading to freak waves

2015-07-28
Physicists like to study unusual kinds of waves, like freak waves found in the sea. Such wave movements can be studied using models designed to describe the dynamics of disturbances. Theoretical physicists, based in France have focused on finding ways of best explaining how wave disturbance occurs under very specific initial conditions that are key to the genesis of these disturbances. They looked for solutions to this puzzle by resolving a type of equation, called the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. It is solved by applying a method designed for studying instabilities ...

New drug for blood cancers now in five phase II clinical trials

2015-07-28
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have established the safety and dosing of a new drug for treating blood cancers. The findings are published online July 27 in The Lancet Haematology. The drug is a small molecule inhibitor that suppresses the activity of a signaling pathway believed to contribute to a variety of blood cancers' eventual resistance to standard chemotherapy treatments. More specifically, preclinical research, funded in part by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), has shown that the drug coaxes ...

Researchers create promising new mouse model for lung injury repair

2015-07-28
Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and The Saban Research Institute of CHLA have created a dynamic functional mouse model for lung injury repair, a tool that will help scientists explain the origins of lung disease and provide a system by which new therapies can be identified and tested. Their findings have been published online by the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. The novel model used targeted Type 2 Alveolar Epithelial cells (AEC2), which line the small sac-like cavities of the lung and are thought to be responsible for injury ...

Report documents unmet need for expanded family planning services at CHCs

2015-07-28
WASHINGTON, DC (July 28, 2015)-- As part of a unique survey of nearly 2,000 women of childbearing age who receive health care at the nation's community health centers, 90 percent reported that they were not actively seeking to become pregnant in the next 12 months. Yet more than 3 out of 10 were not using contraceptives at the time of the survey.The survey's findings signal a clear unmet need for more comprehensive family planning services at health centers, according to a report issued today by the Geiger Gibson /RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative ...

Research with bite

Research with bite
2015-07-28
The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM). The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, was conducted by Kirstin Brink, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Biology at UTM; Professor Robert Reisz of the Department of Biology and the UTM vice-principal ...

Brain disease scenarios revised by step-by-step imaging of toxic aggregation

2015-07-28
Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. The finding can help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Because of our increasing lifespan, diseases like Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's are on the rise. They are caused when certain proteins misfold and aggregate together, forming clumps that damage neurons in the brain and spinal cord. This aggregation evolves progressively through ...

Pitt study: Ancient proteins involved in DNA repair could shed light on tumor development

2015-07-28
PITTSBURGH, July 28, 2015 - By studying the yeast used in beer- and bread-making, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism by which ancient proteins repair DNA damage and how their dysfunction could lead to the development of tumors. The findings, published online today in Nature Communications, could lead to new ways to tailor cancer therapies. In humans, protein mutations called RAD51 paralogues have been associated with breast and ovarian tumors, said senior investigator Kara Bernstein, Ph.D., assistant professor of ...

Plant light sensors came from ancient algae

2015-07-28
DURHAM, N.C. -- The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study from Duke University. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet refuting the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing light-sensing bacteria, the researchers say. The results appear online in Nature Communications. "Much like we see the world through our eyes, plants 'see' ...

Specific cardiovascular risk factors may predict Alzheimer's disease

2015-07-28
OAK BROOK, Ill. - Specific cardiovascular risk factors, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity and diabetes, are associated with smaller regional brain volumes that may be early indicators of Alzheimer's disease and dementia according to a study published online in the journal Radiology. "We already know that vascular risk factors damage the brain and can result in cognitive impairment," said Kevin S. King, M.D., assistant professor of radiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. "But our findings give us a more ...

Omega-3 fatty acids may help improve treatment and quality of life in cancer patients

2015-07-28
Adding omega-3 fatty acids to anti-tumor medications may improve treatment response and quality of life for cancer patients according to a new study by researchers at the University Hospitals of Leicester in the United Kingdom. The study, published today in the OnlineFirst version of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN), the research journal of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), examined 50 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients were given 1,000 mg of gemcitabine weekly followed by up to 100 g of omega-3 ...

New treatment may help neonatal liver disease associated with parenteral nutrition

2015-07-28
A new study finds that exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) treatment may help fight neonatal parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The study, published today in the OnlineFirst version of the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN), the research journal of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), provided neonatal piglets with 17 days of parenteral nutrition therapy and either GLP-2 treatment or saline control. In a previous study, the researchers found that GLP-2 therapy improved bile flow and serum markers ...

Very early birth linked to introversion, neuroticism, and risk aversion in adulthood

2015-07-28
Babies born very premature or severely underweight are at heightened risk of becoming introverted, neurotic, and risk averse as adults, indicates research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood (Fetal & Neonatal Edition). This personality profile may help to explain the higher rates of career and relationship difficulties experienced by this group as adults, suggest the researchers. Very premature birth at less than 32 weeks and/or very low birthweight of less than 1500 g are known to be linked to a heightened risk of autistic spectrum behaviours, ...

Depression and personality disorders drive psych patients to euthanasia

2015-07-28
Depression and personality disorders are the most common diagnoses among Belgian psychiatric patients requesting help to die, on the grounds of unbearable suffering, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open. Drugs, given either by mouth or administered intravenously, are used to perform euthanasia in Belgium, where the practice has been legal since 2002. The researchers wanted to find out if there were any discernible patterns in requests for euthanasia among mentally ill patients in Belgium in a bid to inform recommendations for future research. So ...
Site 1 from 5961
1 [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] ... [5961]
Press-News.org - Free Press Release Distribution service.
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.